BGP. Channel Balancing on Quagga

I will give an example of balancing only incoming traffic with two channels using Quagga.

On the test, I will use Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS and Quagga 0.99.24.1, the network interface ens1f0 for the second provider with one neighbors and ens2f0 for the first provider with two neighbors, the local network will be connected to ens2f1. Both providers announce “default”.
3.3.3.0/23 this will be my network with white IP addresses.
Continue reading “BGP. Channel Balancing on Quagga”

View and configure sharing of files and folders Windows from the command line

I will give an example of some commands for setting up sharing of resources.

View shared resources:

net share

Deleting a shared resource:

net share <sharename> /delete

Sharing a folder:

net share sharename=C:\dir

Example of disconnecting users from the share:

net session \\pc1 /delete

To close an open network file, use the command:

net file file_id /close

An example of granting user rights to a file (N – not set, W – write, C – change, F – full access):

cacls file.txt /G User:w

To cancel user access to a share:

cacls /R User

We allow up to 5 users to simultaneously connect to a shared resource:

net share sharename /users:5

Example of caching settings from a share (manual/BranchCache/documents/programs/none):

net share myshare /cache:manual

I want to note that when opening a share to a resource in the firewall, the following ports should be opened: TCP 139, TCP 445, UDP 137, UDP 138.

See also my articles:
Installing and using the nbtscan network scanner
Some information about the virus encryptor Trojan.Encoder.12544 attacked 06/27/2017

Installing and using the nbtscan network scanner

Install command in Linux Ubuntu/Debian:

sudo apt-get install nbtscan

The Windows version can be downloaded from http://www.unixwiz.net/tools/nbtscan.html

Network scan example:

nbtscan 192.168.1.0/24

I will describe the possible startup keys:
-O FILENAME (output information to file)
-v (more detailed information output)
-p (port indication)
-H (generate HTTP header)
-m (MAC address indication)
-n (do not convert names to DNS, display only IP)
-t NUMBER (response time in seconds, default 1)
-v (display version nbtscan)

Configuring DHCP+TFTP for DOCSIS

Recently, it was necessary to configure the issuance of IP addresses to several old DOCSIS modems and the host located after the modem.
At hand was the Arris Cadant C3 and Thomson TCM-420 modems.

First of all, let’s start a DHCP server that will issue IP addresses to modems, for example, as I described in this article – Installing and configuring isc-dhcp-server.
And also we will launch a TFTP server on which there will be files for modems, for example, as I described in the article – Installing and Configuring a TFTP Server

Continue reading “Configuring DHCP+TFTP for DOCSIS”

How to convert a list of IP addresses to DNS names

In Linux, you can convert a list of IP addresses into DNS names, for example, by a simple script.

To do this, create an empty file with the extension .sh, make it executable and add the content to it:

#!/bin/sh
while read ip traf ; do
    name=`host $ip|awk '{print $NF}'`
    echo -e "$name\t$ip\t$traf"
done >name_ip_traf.lst <ip_traf.lst

Where ip_traf.lst is a file with a list of IP addresses that need to be converted to DNS names.

You can make it executable by the command:

chmod +rwx file.sh

Run the script in the directory where it is located by the command:

./file.sh

Or run by specifying the full path:

/dir/file.sh

After the startup, you must wait for a while or interrupt the execution by pressing CTRL+C.

Network interface in Linux without IP address

To raise the network interface in Linux without an IP address, simply run the command:

ip link set eth1 up

If it is necessary for the network interface to be raised automatically at system startup, then in /etc/network/interfaces, for example:

auto eth1
iface eth1 inet manual
up ifconfig eth1 0.0.0.0 up
down ifcofnig eth1 down

How to enable or disable Proxy ARP on Linux

Let’s look at the status of Proxy ARP (1 – enabled, 0 – disabled):

cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp

You can look at a specific network interface (where eth0 is the name of the network interface):

cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/proxy_arp

You can enable Proxy ARP as follows:

sudo su
echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/eth0/proxy_arp

Or so:

sudo sysctl net.ipv4.conf.all.proxy_arp=1
sudo sysctl net.ipv4.conf.eth0.proxy_arp=1
sudo sysctl -p

To turn off the Proxy ARP commands are similar, you only need to specify 0 instead of 1.

The above changes will be reset after restarting the system so that this does not happen, open the file /etc/sysctl.conf in any text editor:

sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf

And specify:

net.ipv4.conf.all.proxy_arp=1
net.ipv4.conf.eth0.proxy_arp=1

If necessary, you can see the incoming ARP packets via tcpdump:

sudo tcpdump -n -i eth0 -e arp